Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 19 of 19

Thread: Batteries

  1. #11
    Dont worry about shitting yourself
    Gunfixr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Posts
    1,675
    Thanks (Given)
    2
    Thanks (Received)
    174
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    771
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    Some of the ones I have recently purchased are these new ones.
    However, they are new, so there hasn't been time to test their theory. I use oldest ones first, so it'll be awhile before I get to them.

  2. #12
    For the Love of Cats

    Sniper-T's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    The Great White North!
    Posts
    8,681
    Thanks (Given)
    570
    Thanks (Received)
    732
    Likes (Given)
    2425
    Likes (Received)
    4615
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    2
    A way to charge them is quite simple, depending on the size of course...

    http://www.canadiantire.ca/AST/brows....jsp?locale=en
    Give a man fire, and he'll be warm for a day!
    Light a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life!

    Cat's are food... not friends!

    If you're going to fight, then fight like you're the third monkey on the ramp into Noah's arc... and brother, it's starting to rain.

  3. #13
    GunnerMax
    Guest
    I have about 36 AA
    12AAA
    9D
    6 CR123 batteries

    This is so far, more in progress.

  4. #14
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    northern IL
    Posts
    753
    Thanks (Given)
    26
    Thanks (Received)
    39
    Likes (Given)
    85
    Likes (Received)
    312
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Sniper-T View Post
    anyone hear about the new Duracell batteries?
    10 year shelf life guarantee

    http://www.duracell.ca/en-CA/product...batteries.jspx

    I am missing something? It says that they last 10 years in storage*, but I can't find where they explain the asterisk. But I hit my head again today and then fell out of a tree, so maybe it right there in my face.


    I buy a pack each of Costco's batteries when they go on sale, but I cleaned out the junk drawer and realized I have several years worth of 9v and D's, which will probably go bad before I use them. I have a more than average amount of rechargeable AA's and AAA's, two solar charges, a wind up thingy, and an inverter for the car. I also plan on pulling up the solar landscape lights if need be, and keep the batteries for walkie-talkies and the like.

  5. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    MS
    Posts
    132
    Thanks (Given)
    20
    Thanks (Received)
    7
    Likes (Given)
    143
    Likes (Received)
    52
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    Yep, got some put up, but I also use a lot of them. And try my best to rotate and use them up before they reach their no-go date.

    I also have a fair amount of rechargables. Two different solar chargers.

    But batteries forever, nope.

    Jimmy

  6. #16
    Dont worry about shitting yourself
    Gunfixr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Posts
    1,675
    Thanks (Given)
    2
    Thanks (Received)
    174
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    771
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    The asterisk is probably a disclaimer about storage conditions. How you store them will affect how long they will keep. I would suppose you could store them in a manner that they would not last that long.
    These alkaline cell batteries work by a chemical reaction. During storage, and use, the chemical reaction slowly eats up the battery internally, as the liquid component is acidic, until it will no longer make electricity. Car batteries work in much the same way, but use a liquid with dissimilar metals instead of a paste used in AAs, AAAs, etc. This is a rather simplified description, but suffices for what I need here.
    Anyway, this reaction is slowed down in cooler climates, particularly with the cell batteries such as AAs, Ds, etc. This is why many people used to keep them in the refrigerator.

  7. #17
    For the Love of Cats

    Sniper-T's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    The Great White North!
    Posts
    8,681
    Thanks (Given)
    570
    Thanks (Received)
    732
    Likes (Given)
    2425
    Likes (Received)
    4615
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    2
    from the page in the link, scroll right to the bottom. below the copper coloured line, is the * disclaimers
    Give a man fire, and he'll be warm for a day!
    Light a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life!

    Cat's are food... not friends!

    If you're going to fight, then fight like you're the third monkey on the ramp into Noah's arc... and brother, it's starting to rain.

  8. #18
    may be in trouble

    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    East of the Kingdom of Nye
    Posts
    565
    Thanks (Given)
    33
    Thanks (Received)
    70
    Likes (Given)
    79
    Likes (Received)
    219
    Dislikes (Given)
    7
    Dislikes (Received)
    3
    Before Heaven, why, why, why am I stuck woith all these necros...

    Pipe down and get to it.

    Anyway. NiMH was the top end for long duration for its day. The new kids on the block are batteries that use lithium compounds. The one most able and stable although not #1 efficient (but close) is lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4)... Mostly known as Lifepo's.

    Tech side information is here...https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lithiu...sphate_battery and I've been trying to weed thru the various vendors to avoid duplication.

    The big sell is that it has a very very low shelf discharge rate and a reasonable weight advantage. That and Very old Lifepo's apparently don't corrode and be chemically hazardous... they just collapse into a rust inside the battery. ( Having to take up the excessive slack at my WM by 'helping' out the auto department, I've had to pull more than my share of batteries where ijits had yanked off battery caps, or the damned things were indeed SMOKING... and having to get the damned things out of the building and get PPE to drown the damn things in pool sized baking soda, them looking at us bovinely as we looked at them with "How in HELL did you get that out of the car and you not burned?" looks... But I digress)

    Me, I'm wondering if older battery materials might be thought on for post SHTF. Allesandro Volta's voltaic pile was copper and zinc discs separated by saltwater moistened cardboard... and such an item would lend itself very well to ease of assembly and salvage. Putting a fan on the top of of the pile to vent hydrogen might make them last longer. I'm trying to remember what the old "wild West" era telegraph batteries were powered by....

    K

  9. #19
    Dont worry about shitting yourself
    Gunfixr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Posts
    1,675
    Thanks (Given)
    2
    Thanks (Received)
    174
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    771
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    As I've cut open a few lead acid car type batteries that were old, I can tell you that the metals slowly deteriorate, basically dissolving into dust that collects on the bottom.
    That's why they never last but so long. Even not using them, this happens.
    Once the dust pile gets high enough to touch the plates, it shorts, and it's done.

    Sent from my SGP612 using Tapatalk
    Liberty is not a cruise ship full of pampered passengers.
    Liberty is a Man-Of-War, and we are all crew.

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •