Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 17 of 17

Thread: First House

  1. #11
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Upper Penninsula
    Posts
    27
    Thanks (Given)
    8
    Thanks (Received)
    8
    Likes (Given)
    14
    Likes (Received)
    19
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    It is all cleared acreage for the most part. I planned on doing a few fruit and nut trees. I need to add a few blue spruce along the front half to act as a windbreak for during the winter.

    I'm all for doing my own food and I will gladly plant and tend almost anything I can get my hands on provided it will grow this far north.

  2. #12
    I'll most likely shit myself


    bacpacker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    East Tennessee
    Posts
    7,169
    Thanks (Given)
    1623
    Thanks (Received)
    619
    Likes (Given)
    7913
    Likes (Received)
    2077
    Dislikes (Given)
    1
    Dislikes (Received)
    1
    If memory serves I'm pretty sure apples, cherries, and blueberries all do pretty well up there.

  3. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    chesapeake bay, virginia
    Posts
    136
    Thanks (Given)
    64
    Thanks (Received)
    36
    Likes (Given)
    39
    Likes (Received)
    115
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    Gm2,

    My Friend out in Tennessee just bought himself a tractor....with front end loader and a backhoe on it.

    He lives far into the mountains and down a long country winding lane. He is going to work on the maintenance on his country lane with this tractor.

    He also told me last night ..on our ham radios..that he bought one of those four wheelers. I did not know you could put a amall bulldozer blade on the front of them. If I recall the gist of our conversation ....his four wheeler has four wheel drive that you can engage or disengage at will.

    It is good to have the proper tools to lower your physical labors...provided you can keep and maintain this equipment.


    The fruit and nut trees sounds like a good idea.


    Thanks,
    Orangetom

  4. #14
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Upper Penninsula
    Posts
    27
    Thanks (Given)
    8
    Thanks (Received)
    8
    Likes (Given)
    14
    Likes (Received)
    19
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    Yeah a large tractor would be nice but building a bridge for one to get to the back of the property would be a pretty mean feat. I'm just opting for a smaller tractor. Between the snowblower attachment, trailer and 54" deck, I think I can do the majority of what I need to around here. The only problem with using a 4 wheeler with a blade on it is that you can't really push 2 feet of snow around very well with something that light. This year we got a foot and a half overnight once. maintaining them isn't an issue. I grew up around farm equipment and always took care of it rather than taking it to the shim of a service station we had.

    I looked at the local TSC since they seem to be pretty up to date on what does well. Cherry, blueberries, plums, fuji and red delicious apples, are all sold there for a decent price. Not great but decent.

    Can't decide on which type of nut trees would be used most though. Acorns would be nice because the deer could eat anything I don't. Which would probably be all of it because of how bitter they are. There is a sweet acorn I saw somewhere but I have no idea how it stacks up. I might plant a few of those on the off-chance and then just hickory and black walnut for the rest.

  5. #15
    Do you have a robot?
    realist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Northern CA,
    Posts
    2,178
    Thanks (Given)
    150
    Thanks (Received)
    170
    Likes (Given)
    339
    Likes (Received)
    821
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    gm2 congrats on the new home. Hope you will grow and prosper.

    I have property with a creek running through it too. I stressed over building a bridge so I could get a firetruck into the property. My solution was to put in a large culvert the size of the creek. It worked great but was just a little too narrow for my liking. Sooo I put an extension on it. It was simple to install and there is no maintenance. The front of it is armored with cement in burlap bags stacked like a bunker to channel the water and prevent erosion. On the down stream side I put big rocks to slow the water and prevent erosion. Good luck.

    Fruit trees are wonderful and will serve you well for many years.
    If it is predictable then it is preventable....... Gordon Graham

    So if it is predictable and preventable then you better prepare.

  6. #16
    Walking on Sunshine

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Mid Michigan
    Posts
    2,040
    Thanks (Given)
    74
    Thanks (Received)
    225
    Likes (Given)
    198
    Likes (Received)
    510
    Dislikes (Given)
    2
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    Congrats gm, Welcome from one of the trolls down south LOL, sounds like you've been very busy.

  7. #17
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Upper Penninsula
    Posts
    27
    Thanks (Given)
    8
    Thanks (Received)
    8
    Likes (Given)
    14
    Likes (Received)
    19
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    Katrina,
    I have been very busy and I'm not even a yooper myself so no hard feelings. I was raised a Hoosier.

    Realist,
    Yeah that's what I think I have decided to do. I have a few high spots in the yard to level out anyways.

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •