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Thread: Winter survival

  1. #11
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    My recommendations (and I've actually been to Lake Kapuskasing, in February, when it's -40C).

    -30C isn't that bad.... -22F. The thing to watch out for is the wind.

    When the weather is that cold, I typically wear (if I'm going outside) a set of medium poly long underwear (tops and bottoms), a poly fleece sweater with a 1/4 zip, a poly jacket, and a Cabelas down parka http://www.cabelas.com/product/M-TRA...ka%26CQ_st%3Db.

    I will wear poly fleece pants and a pair of GI wool field pants with over shell (and suspenders), and a waterproof layer on the bottom http://www.cabelas.com/product/cloth..._SEQ_104176980

    And snowmobile boots https://www.amazon.com/Sorel-Alpha-P...ots%2Bmen&th=1

    A scarf!

    Boots don't have to be $500 - thats stupid, you're not climbing Mt. Everest. A pair of Sorel's or equal for $100 is fine. A pair of very lightweight liner socks and a pair of heavy insulating socks. Get the boots a size bigger to fit over the socks https://www.amazon.com/Sorel-Mens-Ca...ots%2Bmen&th=1

    Windproof is more important that waterproof for the outer layer. You don't want sweat to build up on the clothes and you won't get precipitation at -30.

    A hat - a bomber or whatever, that covers the ears. Some sort of Balaclava too.

    Gloves - at those temps, I wear snowboarding gloves (no, I don't snowboard). Or Mitts (better), with liner gloves.

    For pants, I'd include a pair of (heavy) fleece sleep pants....I get mine at Walmart. Sitting in a snow blind, it will get cold...Jeans are right out - they're called hypothermia pants for a reason. If you can't wear wool, then poly fleece is the way to go, with a windproof BREATHABLE layer on the outside.

    I would also take a heavy-duty space blanket https://www.amazon.com/Space-All-Wea...2Bblanket&th=1

  2. #12
    stark assed naked and butt to nut with no issues
    Stormfeather's Avatar
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    Being as how I teach Winter Survival, everything Ive read from everyone is solid on advice, nothing Ive seen stands out as wrong or possibly debilitating, sounds like everyone who commented has frozen their ass off at one point in time to have learned their lesson!
    RELIGION IS LIKE A PENIS
    Its fine to have one,
    Its fine to be proud of it,
    But please dont whip it out in public and start waving it around,
    And PLEASE dont try to force it down my children's throats.

    An armed society is a polite society. Manners are good when one may have to back up his acts with his life.

  3. #13
    For the Love of Cats


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    here here!
    Give a man fire, and he'll be warm for a day!
    Light a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life!

    Cat's are food... not friends!

    If you're going to fight, then fight like you're the third monkey on the ramp into Noah's arc... and brother, it's starting to rain.

  4. #14
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    Great list sniper... great answers. I know that when it starts to dip below -30 I get a real hankering to spend a day or two outside. The colder the better.

    The only thing I might add, and it's only for personal preference is a dickie. I know when I'm out on cold days and I'm working up a heavy sweat on the dome, some times I need to take the wool toque or balaclava off for a bit to regulate. Having that neck warmer is key for me though. I make my own, but even bought ones can be pulled up over the snout and bottom of ears while the noggin catches some breathing room.

    Chapstick as well. Good for hands and lips. In those temps Vaseline isn't good (in my experience).


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  5. #15
    For the Love of Cats


    Sniper-T's Avatar
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    I've been looking for a decent dickie for years and haven't found one... But, my mother in law likes to knit... hmmm...
    Give a man fire, and he'll be warm for a day!
    Light a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life!

    Cat's are food... not friends!

    If you're going to fight, then fight like you're the third monkey on the ramp into Noah's arc... and brother, it's starting to rain.

  6. #16
    I'll most likely shit myself



    bacpacker's Avatar
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    Good list everyone. I have never been out in below -20 so can't comment about -40. I have spent weekends backpacking at +/- single digits. My main thing was to stay dry. I am very prone to sweating my ass off and usually have to dress down to stay dry and change shirts as soon as I get to camp.

    One thing about your friends list, stay far away from cotton. It's comfortable, but deadly when wet. And it will not dry out for a long time.

  7. #17
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    One thing I forgot to mention...don't wear a belt, wear suspenders. Let warm air move up your body.

  8. #18
    He's old and grumpy, but not fat. He'll be right back...he has to go tell some kids to get off his lawn

    Stg1swret's Avatar
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    Wind Chill and Hypothermia are biggies to combat. I was stationed in Maine for 4 years, and have seen way to many cases of frost bite and such. Dressing in layers than allow sweat to leave and keep the core warm is essential. When the extremities start to tingle, it is time to re-evaluate and check them. It doesn't take long to get a really good case of frost bite at any temp below 20 degrees, and in the wind, and you can drift into real trouble quickly. Once frost bite sets in, you need to warm up slowly, or you will do extensive damage to tissue. Left untreated or treated wrong you'll be visiting the doctor at the least, and in some cases the hospital. Know whatyour exposure time is for the conditions you will be in.
    "There are no winners in war, only bigger losers"


    If you see me or hear me coming, I'm not doing my job.

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